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49 notes

For those who blamed the Black community for passing Prop 8 and Amendment 1

missatralissa:

ladyatheist:

SCIENCE SAYS YOU ARE WRONG.
http://freethoughtblogs.com/crommunist/2012/05/10/race-and-gay-marriage-the-story-of-a-proposition/  

The study shows that race was not a significant factor in determining how a person would vote on Prop 8. Instead, political affiliation, religion, and age were more likely to determine how people would vote on Prop. The article summarizes the study with this:  Black Californians were not much more likely to vote to withhold recognition of human rights than non-black Californians.” 

So stop blaming the black community for road blocks in LGBT movement. If you’re going to blame anyone, blame old religious conservatives.  

Wait… what? People were blaming black people for Prop 8??

Uh… It was the Mormons who donated a disgusting amount of money to Prop 8 and all the other churches that jumped on board.

I remember how you couldn’t pass a single church at that time without seeing a Prop 8 sign on their lawn. It was ridiculous. 

Wait, what? Who blamed blacks? This feels suspiciously like one of those shady “Now with no mercury!” on the side of a cereal box. Making everyone doubt all the other cereals thinking they have mercury when none of them had any mercury to begin with. 

So it’s like “Blacks aren’t quite as homophobic as everyone thought” is sparking some seed of doubt that blacks must be at least a but more homophobic than most to warrant the label. 

(Source: womanistgamergirl, via missapea)

Filed under queerkhmer gay rights marriage equality lgbt stop blaming black people

56 notes

When people think marriage equality is the only thing on the “gay agenda”

goddammitzak:

You forgot

  • tolerance
  • acceptance
  • education
  • anti-bullying
  • anti-discrimination
  • promotion to stop legal persecution of gays
  • reduction of the social stigma
  • education about other groups like asexuals and trans*
  • a better and more informed future

Marriage is nice and everything, but even if you disagree with it, would you want the short end of the stick on any and all of these other human rights too? Because these are all very pertinent issues to, and you need to realize there is more to the hate than the marriage issue.

Filed under discrimination gay marriage homophobia human rights lgbt lgbtq

5 notes

missatralissa:

To be honest, a scene involving two comic book characters who are in a long-standing, committed relationship kissing is not interesting. The kiss getting nearly a full page devoted to it is nothing special, especially when one considers the dozens of comic covers published every year depicting the same act. It’s something that, unless shamefully gratuitous, I never think twice about while reading my stack of comics every Wednesday. That is — if the couple is straight.
Wiccan and Hulking, two teenage male characters who have been in a relationship since their 2005 debut in Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung’s “Young Avengers,” got the full-page smooch-stravaganza treatment in last week’s “Avengers: The Children’s Crusade” #9. They’re a couple, they’re in love, they kissed. The thought that the lip lock might be newsworthy didn’t occur to me at all until I saw somewhere in the labyrinth of the internet that it was their first kiss. Marvel’s been progressive in depicting their other two prominent gay couples (Shatterstar and RIctor, Northstar and Kyle). They are affectionate when the story calls for it, and kiss each other in-between action plot points.
But Wiccan and Hulkling, perhaps due to being published infrequently, didn’t kiss until last Wednesday. I’m certain that the delay wasn’t Marvel-mandated, as evidenced by the publisher’s full support of gay characters in other books. I know it wasn’t due to the creators having bigoted heebie jeebies, as writer Allan Heinberg is himself gay and has gone above and beyond to portray gay characters with the same amount of respect as their straight teammates.
So what’s the story here? Wiccan and Hulkling finally kissed, just like other couples. The way the world should work, the way I believe it is headed, and possibly even the way younger members of the LGBT community perceive it, this kiss means nothing more than what it is: it’s a kiss. But as someone who lives in the overlapping part of the “Gay Person” and “Comic Book Fan” Venn diagram (and also as someone who loves talking about themselves), I feel a need to talk about where my brain goes when I see gay characters be affectionate.
When I see a gay couple kiss in comics, it should read the same as Clark kissing Lois. But it doesn’t, because the society we live in has made love a politically-charged issue. When I see a gay couple kiss in a superhero comic book, I wonder if it’s going to get protested. I wonder if the comic is going to get tons of hate mail. I become hyper-critical of the kiss and put way too much thought into whether or not they are characters or caricatures. I wonder if there were meetings with executives in stiff suits, discussing how big the panel should be and how advertisers would react. I wonder if anyone on the creative team felt awkward about drawing, inking, coloring or lettering a page showing a couple of dudes expressing their love for each other. My sexuality has been politicized to the point where I can’t read a kiss between two fictional characters without thinking every insane thing I just listed. And yes, I think all the things I think are insane, because Marvel and the creators have given me no reason to doubt their sincerity. But I’ve seen bigotry on television, in comic book letters pages and in my own life. Even though the comic book industry has been incredibly supportive of the LGBT community and has made great strides towards diversifying their characters, I still let the words of the people currently vying for the Republican nomination spoil what should be a celebratory, progressive moment.
I’m glad that Hulkling and Wiccan kissed. I’m glad that comic books are now regularly depicting diversity. It’s important to know that the gender of the kissers should not be news. It’s two characters kissing, and that’s awesome (as long as you think those two characters are right for each other, like Kitty Pryde and Iceman — yep, I went there). But also keep in mind that right now, in 2012, the world at large is not necessarily so accepting, and there are politicians running for president on the promise of nullifying same-sex marriages if elected. Comic books are leading the progressive charge right now and I just hope that the rest of the world can catch up. When I read my comics, I want to stop worrying about the underlying politics; I want to start being happy for the characters.
(via The Politics of Wiccan and Hulkling - Comic Book Resources)

Huh. I was under the impression that the kiss was not so much important because it was a kiss, but because hulkling had just proposed immediately beforehand and the kiss was Wiccan saying yes. So I think them getting married is kind of a big deal, but I could have been reading too much into the preceding page. 

missatralissa:

To be honest, a scene involving two comic book characters who are in a long-standing, committed relationship kissing is not interesting. The kiss getting nearly a full page devoted to it is nothing special, especially when one considers the dozens of comic covers published every year depicting the same act. It’s something that, unless shamefully gratuitous, I never think twice about while reading my stack of comics every Wednesday. That is — if the couple is straight.

Wiccan and Hulking, two teenage male characters who have been in a relationship since their 2005 debut in Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung’s “Young Avengers,” got the full-page smooch-stravaganza treatment in last week’s “Avengers: The Children’s Crusade” #9. They’re a couple, they’re in love, they kissed. The thought that the lip lock might be newsworthy didn’t occur to me at all until I saw somewhere in the labyrinth of the internet that it was their first kiss. Marvel’s been progressive in depicting their other two prominent gay couples (Shatterstar and RIctor, Northstar and Kyle). They are affectionate when the story calls for it, and kiss each other in-between action plot points.

But Wiccan and Hulkling, perhaps due to being published infrequently, didn’t kiss until last Wednesday. I’m certain that the delay wasn’t Marvel-mandated, as evidenced by the publisher’s full support of gay characters in other books. I know it wasn’t due to the creators having bigoted heebie jeebies, as writer Allan Heinberg is himself gay and has gone above and beyond to portray gay characters with the same amount of respect as their straight teammates.

So what’s the story here? Wiccan and Hulkling finally kissed, just like other couples. The way the world should work, the way I believe it is headed, and possibly even the way younger members of the LGBT community perceive it, this kiss means nothing more than what it is: it’s a kiss. But as someone who lives in the overlapping part of the “Gay Person” and “Comic Book Fan” Venn diagram (and also as someone who loves talking about themselves), I feel a need to talk about where my brain goes when I see gay characters be affectionate.

When I see a gay couple kiss in comics, it should read the same as Clark kissing Lois. But it doesn’t, because the society we live in has made love a politically-charged issue. When I see a gay couple kiss in a superhero comic book, I wonder if it’s going to get protested. I wonder if the comic is going to get tons of hate mail. I become hyper-critical of the kiss and put way too much thought into whether or not they are characters or caricatures. I wonder if there were meetings with executives in stiff suits, discussing how big the panel should be and how advertisers would react. I wonder if anyone on the creative team felt awkward about drawing, inking, coloring or lettering a page showing a couple of dudes expressing their love for each other. My sexuality has been politicized to the point where I can’t read a kiss between two fictional characters without thinking every insane thing I just listed. And yes, I think all the things I think are insane, because Marvel and the creators have given me no reason to doubt their sincerity. But I’ve seen bigotry on television, in comic book letters pages and in my own life. Even though the comic book industry has been incredibly supportive of the LGBT community and has made great strides towards diversifying their characters, I still let the words of the people currently vying for the Republican nomination spoil what should be a celebratory, progressive moment.

I’m glad that Hulkling and Wiccan kissed. I’m glad that comic books are now regularly depicting diversity. It’s important to know that the gender of the kissers should not be news. It’s two characters kissing, and that’s awesome (as long as you think those two characters are right for each other, like Kitty Pryde and Iceman — yep, I went there). But also keep in mind that right now, in 2012, the world at large is not necessarily so accepting, and there are politicians running for president on the promise of nullifying same-sex marriages if elected. Comic books are leading the progressive charge right now and I just hope that the rest of the world can catch up. When I read my comics, I want to stop worrying about the underlying politics; I want to start being happy for the characters.

(via The Politics of Wiccan and Hulkling - Comic Book Resources)

Huh. I was under the impression that the kiss was not so much important because it was a kiss, but because hulkling had just proposed immediately beforehand and the kiss was Wiccan saying yes. So I think them getting married is kind of a big deal, but I could have been reading too much into the preceding page. 

(via missapea)

Filed under comics Marvel Wiccan Hulking Young Avengers lgbt

8 notes

[TW Hate crime against gay teen] Oklahoma Teen Beaten Unconscious in Hate Crime, Takes Action

missatralissa:

oklahoma teen hate crime, tulsa teen hate crime cody, cody rogers tulsa hate crime, tulsa teen beaten unconcious

18-year old Cody Rogers is taking a stand against hate crimes after he was beaten unconscious at a party. The Tulsa, Oklahoma teen says he was attacked after a group of his male peers were heard using homophobic slurs, and asked to leave.

“There were some ladies who invited their boyfriends (to a going away party) who had a problem with some of the homosexuals that were there.”

Cody could hear the homophobic slurs from another room, and when those boyfriends were asked to leave the apartment, one refused. That person attacked Cody’s friend, a 21 year-old girl.

“I stepped in and they threw me to the ground, obviously, I’m a little beat up,” Cody said.

As he was on the ground, the two teens attacking him kept shouting the slurs. His friends were shocked to see it all unfold.

… It’s classified as simple assault,” Cody said of the case.

His friend Jordan thinks it should be classified as more, “I believe 100 percent that this was a hate crime.”

Currently, sexual orientation is not protected under Oklahoma hate crime laws, which include race, religion, national origin, and disability.

Cody has created a Facebook page to promote awareness, and help better Tulsa as a community. I want to give him major props for his bravery; my heart goes out to him during this time.

How many cases like this do we need to see before more legislation occurs? How should hate crimes in the United States be classified? How should we make these types of decisions?

Not only does it need to be treated as a hate crime (surprised that Oklahoma doesn’t have it in the books, actually), but they need to work on getting the police to actually follow through on things like this. It is not really a secret that many police departments intentionally drag their feet in cases like this and don’t make a serious effort to charge and prosecute offenders. 

(via missapea)

Filed under hate crime lgbt

919 notes

Cissexist bigot calls for a boycott of Girl Scout cookies, since the Girl Scouts include *all* girls, whether cisgender or not. I say, we have a Girl Scout buy-out instead, where we buy ALL the cookies to show our support for Girl Scouts of the USA's inclusiveness.

missatralissa:

seriouslyamerica:

ceasesilence:

cherutenu:

I did not know the Girl Scouts were so inclusive.  That’s not the case with the Boy Scouts, right?  I mean, would they allow a transboy to join?  I seem to recall they have issues with letting gay men be Scout leaders…

Anyway, who wants Girl Scout cookies?  I’ll buy.

I don’t know about the Boy Scouts. The Girl Scouts made the news when Christian groups found out that transgender girls were in some troops, and had a tantrum over it, and then Girl Scouts of the USA stood up and said that it welcomes all girls, and if someone identifies as a girl and wants to be a Girl Scout, that’s good enough for them. That, of course, made the right-wingers have conniptions and choke on their drinks at the very thought of children being included in a group that fits them, hence this video.

BUY ALL THE COOKIES!

I always buy Girl Scout cookies. Now I will buy even more and enjoy every bite knowing this bitch is somewhere crying about her privileges. 

Props to the Girl Scouts for this. I can’t believe there are some people out there who are so narrow minded and hateful that they want to make life hell for kids. Not even just their own kids, but the kids of other people they have never met. I think the parents of the kids who allow their kids to attend girl scouts and identify as female even if they were not born anatomically female. 

Also to respond a comment earlier. Boy Scouts are super restrictive. There are still debates over whether or not to allow gays to be a part of it. Last I heard the official ruling was that there could not be any openly gay troop leaders. 

(Source: lavendersprigsandcoffee, via missapea)

Filed under girl scouts trans rights lgbt

730,402 notes

unfboy:

complexlysimplekiddo:
from left to right;
I am afraid to hold my boyfriend’s hand.
My friend’s parents sent her away.
I found death threats in my locker.
I submitted to electroshock therapy.
I lost half my friends after coming out.
My grandmother sends me hate mail.
My school won’t let me take my date to prom.
I am not here anymore.
My dad tried to beat it out of me. 
No one is proud of me.

unfboy:

complexlysimplekiddo:

from left to right;

I am afraid to hold my boyfriend’s hand.

My friend’s parents sent her away.

I found death threats in my locker.

I submitted to electroshock therapy.

I lost half my friends after coming out.

My grandmother sends me hate mail.

My school won’t let me take my date to prom.

I am not here anymore.

My dad tried to beat it out of me. 

No one is proud of me.

(via unfboy-deactivated20130319)

Filed under lgbt